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silvermachine

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  1. I really like the new Core designs and they are very functional. But theres nobody making anything (cases) with curves... The new Soprano is the only real choice. Then some would have to conformise for some NZXT or Corsair, that are not trully "curvy", but at least they have some round lines. The "serious" and "simple" design is good but there are soooooooo many companies doing it right now. LianLI, Silverstone, Corsair, Antec, Phanteks,CoolerMaster, BitFenix, InWin, NZXT etc etc etc etc...... One box after another with the same "serious" and "simple-line" look...... And TT is following their lead- first the Core V line which was "simple" but with a small curve on top, then Core X that minimized this curve, and now TH10 which is totally straight-line. But so are all the rest of the products from all the rest of the pack......... I really miss the old days of Kandalf, Armor, Tsunami, Soprano and the rest. And the best characteristic of the cases of those days was the 100% quality of the inner case, with the aesthetics that nobody else could match!!!! I still own 5 TT cases from those days and I refuse to sell them (no matter how much my wife is complaining that occupy space in the house), because I consider them works of art. Nobody EVER did such designs, those days or nowadays for that matter. It would be a dream-come-true to have the sturdy, modular, quality inner build of Core series with a awesome new curvy outer design. And I dont say here a total new-from-scratch case. No. Use some of the already existing pieces but with different "clothes".
  2. I read a few things on the net on this subject and as a long time TT fan I'd like to know more. Any official explanation/clarification?
  3. I dont know the precise dimentions u are asking for but I can give u an idea: if for some reason the holes do not align precisely with the case holes -sometimes it happens-, u can always cut a small plastic or metal thin "base", screw the rez on that and then open your own holes and screw the base (with the rez on it) on the case. If u are talking about a TT case, the chances are that the pacific rez is designed to go with the case. If the case is of a different brand the chances are again that u dont need to worry about it. Most of these dimentions are universal. And in the worst of scenarios, u only need a dremel and a spray to make the small "adaptor" base I told u.
  4. One question- I own an old TR2 470W which has 1 pci-e connector. I tried to put it in a build with a 7870, using a mole-to-pcie adaptor for the second vga input. Using various psu calculators, the necessary power was somewhere between 380 to 400W, so I thought I was covered. It didnt work. Took the vga in another built with a Smart 730SE (which has 2 regular pcie connectors) and all is fine. The TR2 now is powering up a apu pc with no problem whatsoever. So both parts are working. The only thing I can imagine creating a problem is the 2nd PCIe connector that was "fake". Does anyone know the difference between the 12V of the pcie connector and the 12V of the molex connector in this (or other) model(s)? And if theres a difference why are there molex-to-pci adaptors?
  5. Its been a few months since u posted but I will try to give u some info here in case u come back and read. 1. The distance between opposite screw holes is 22cm on the window of Armor+ VH6000- the very big one. The same distance is 23cm on the Armor VA8000 window- the big one but not the tallest. Somehow the fan is bigger on the "smaller" case. Both numbers are true. 2. The fan on the side and its mounting are very good. Back in 2008 after getting my first Armor case I remember how happy I was with the noise level (!). I could literally hear the psu working. Through the years, thou, I've read many critics on this subject and it comes down to (bad) luck. If u are not lucky, u may get a noisy fan or a not-so-well mounted one. From my experience I can tell you that the original TT fan stays "quiet" for 2 to 3 years. Then u might need to change it. I did with a Bitfenix one just because a friend gave it to me for free. I had to change the color of my new build in the good-old Armor case that could still do the dirty job. Later I changed the build inside it for a 3rd time and put some apu mobo. It didnt need some special cooling but I managed to fit a spare TT fan I had from a V9 case (the top fan), which fitted just fine. That is a relatively low-airflow fan, but did the job + fitted the new theme (black). The noise levels with the 2 "new" fans were at the same levels with the initial one. What I did the last time thou (with the top V9 fan) was to put some rubber grommets inbetween the plastic window and the fan. Simple trick but effective= made the build even more silent. But the real answer to your question lies with quality. TT was putting mass-production fans with those models to keep the cost low (today in many cases it gives some top-notch fans). The only solution is to substitute the old aging fan with a better one (that u have to pay extra for). U get what u pay for my friend. Put some grommets between the new fan and the window and u have a silent pc. 3. I've never seen any modding documentation on specific cases. What I can tell u -again from my experience- is to keep everything together in 1 box. Dont put them in different places or u will lose control. The level of dismantling depends on the painting u want to give your case. Myself I took it completely apart and gave all pieces to a car-painting furnace. It was black and I did the interior totally black too (car paint jobs are way better because they dont scratch easily). Then I put it back together again and installed the hardware. But it was easy because I kept all things together and had their screws all in 1 bag. Trust yourself and TT. They make good cases which are easy to take apart and put back together. Plus they are sturdy and u dont have to be afraid u will damage anything. The point u stop "dismantling" is when there are no more screws. Anything that can be unscrewed, should be so, and get painted separately. If u do it yourself dont forget to primer the metal before u apply the regular paint. Have a steady hand and try to finish the job in 1 hand of primer and 1 hand of paint, so the thickness of the paint of the finished product doesnt obstruct any joints. Screwholes are gonna get covered, so keep that in mind when u try to screw the case back up- u need to apply gentle force to screw them back and remove the paint from the holes. GL with your armor.
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